SOURCES AND METHODS FOR ATLANTIC HISTORY

SOURCES AND METHODS FOR ATLANTIC HISTORY

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iten
Code
72200
ACADEMIC YEAR
2018/2019
CREDITS
6 credits during the 1st year of 9917 HISTORICAL SCIENCES (LM-84) GENOVA
SCIENTIFIC DISCIPLINARY SECTOR
SPS/05
LANGUAGE
Italian
TEACHING LOCATION
GENOVA (HISTORICAL SCIENCES)
semester
2° Semester
Teaching materials

OVERVIEW

The course serves to introduce the student to the analysis of the primary sources pertaining to Atlantic history, and how this discipline has been established and developed.

AIMS AND CONTENT

LEARNING OUTCOMES

The course will analyze some primary sources upon which the history of English-speaking and French-speaking Atlantic area was reconstructed. The course will focus on North America from 1492 to 1791, including the history of Native Americans and the history of the slaves of African descent. The course will include some teacher-led lectures, but it will be based on students' oral presentations mostly. Students will be given reading assignments to be discussed in class. The main learning outcome of the course is to have a general knowledge of the primary sources of historiography related to the first three centuries of the North-American history, and the historiographic debate which is associated with such sources.

AIMS AND LEARNING OUTCOMES

The course examines the key primary sources upon which the historiography has relied to reconstruct the history of the Anglo-French Atlantic area with particular emphasis on North America, in his formative period, from 1492 to 1791, including the Native people and the slaves of African descent. At the end of the course the student will be able to:

 

1) understand how the concept of Atlantic world and Atlantic historiography has been developed.

2) identify which types of sources are necessary to understand the Atlantic area.

3) read and analyze the primary sources used by Atlantic history.

PREREQUISITES

Given that the course will examine a wide area through a longer chronological perspective, it is advised that any student should have already taken the course on history of North America and/or Latin America. It is also advisable to have a basic knowledge of early-modern European history.

Teaching methods

The course consists of two parts:

- the first series of classes are held by the professor on the concept of Atlantic world/Atlantic history and its evolution.

- the second part of the course will be held in a seminar's format, during which the students will have to read, analyze, and discuss a primary source -always different - and that will be assigned at the end of each class.

- a written part during which the students, at the end of the course, will write a short paper (max 4 pages), which will be presented during the class.

Given the above teaching methods, it is strongly advised a constant attendance to the classes and the  carrying out of papers and individual presentations during the course. No exceptions are allowed. Those who attend must be able to read texts in English, French, Italian, and Spanish. The student who cannot attend or who rarely attend can do the final exam on the basis of the texts indicated in the bibliography. Anyone who can't find the texts indicated in the bibliography can contact the professor for further information.

SYLLABUS/CONTENT

Contents for students who are taking the 6-CFU course

The course is aimed at analyzing the development of the concept of Atlantic history, and the primary sources of its historiography. The course will consider the English-speaking and French-speaking Atlantic – specifically North America and the Caribbean – from 1492 to 1791. The first few classes will be dedicated to the origins and development of Atlantic history. The rest of the course will be based on students' oral presentations. Students will be given reading assignments to be discussed in class. Students are advised to take this course after successful completion of the course "History of North America". The course won't cover the period following 1791, but such period is nevertheless part of the topics of the final exam. For attending students, regular attendance is required, together with presentations and other assignments. No exceptions will be made. Attending students must be able to read texts in French, English and Italian; They can skip the texts indicated in the bibliography section (excepted text number 1). Non-attending students and students who don't attend regularly can prepare for the exam by studying the texts indicated in the bibliography section. Students who struggle to find the texts included in the bibliography must promptly ask the professor for help and further instructions.

RECOMMENDED READING/BIBLIOGRAPHY

The reading list for this course, together with the lecturer's suggestions and instructions are available on the Italian version of the web page.

TEACHERS AND EXAM BOARD

Ricevimento: Monday 11-12 a.m. 

Exam Board

MATTEO BINASCO (President)

CHIARA VANGELISTA

LUCA LO BASSO

LESSONS

Teaching methods

The course consists of two parts:

- the first series of classes are held by the professor on the concept of Atlantic world/Atlantic history and its evolution.

- the second part of the course will be held in a seminar's format, during which the students will have to read, analyze, and discuss a primary source -always different - and that will be assigned at the end of each class.

- a written part during which the students, at the end of the course, will write a short paper (max 4 pages), which will be presented during the class.

Given the above teaching methods, it is strongly advised a constant attendance to the classes and the  carrying out of papers and individual presentations during the course. No exceptions are allowed. Those who attend must be able to read texts in English, French, Italian, and Spanish. The student who cannot attend or who rarely attend can do the final exam on the basis of the texts indicated in the bibliography. Anyone who can't find the texts indicated in the bibliography can contact the professor for further information.

LESSONS START

Monday, October 15th

EXAMS

Exam description

The final exam consists of an oral examination which will assess the student's capacity to have understood the key concepts of Atlantic history and its meaning in today's context.

Assessment methods

- During the course students will do individual oral presentations
- Final exam: an oral exam on the topics covered by the course and bibliography. A commission will evaluate students' success in reaching learning goals by testing students' knowledge of topics, students' ability to answer promptly and accurately, and their ability to speak clearly and confidently.
- Students' knowledge and understanding will be assessed. The course is meant to enable students to acquire solid knowledge of the history and historiography of North-Atlantic area (and its relationship with Europe) in modern and contemporary age.
- Students' ability to use their knowledge will also be assessed. The course enables students to perfect their abilities (ability to write correctly, to present one's knowledge to specialized and non-specialized audiences, to use their knowledge in professional or academic contexts.

Exam schedule

Date Time Location Type Notes
02/09/2019 09:00 GENOVA Orale