MEDIEVAL HISTORY

MEDIEVAL HISTORY

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iten
Code
65207
ACADEMIC YEAR
2017/2018
CREDITS
12 credits during the 2nd year of 8459 History (L-42)
9 credits during the 2nd year of 8455 Philosophy (L-5)
SCIENTIFIC DISCIPLINARY SECTOR
M-STO/01
LANGUAGE
Italian
TEACHING LOCATION
GENOVA (History)
semester
1° Semester

OVERVIEW

The course covers the period from the 5th to the 15th century.  Medieval history deals with institutions, societies and main events involved in the origin of Europe. 

AIMS AND CONTENT

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Students will get acquainted with the historic evolution that affected Europe between the Barbarian Age and Late Middle ages (5th-15th centuries). The main themes around which the course is built are: Middle Ages and encounter between civilizations; Middle Ages and Origin of Europe; Middle Ages in Italy. Students will be able to understand the evolution of institutions, societies and political contexts; they will be able to consult historic sources, give examples and refer to historiographic updates.

AIMS AND LEARNING OUTCOMES

Students will have a solid knowledge of major themes, and they will be able to analyze and contextualize the sources used during classes.

Teaching methods

Lessons about the main subjects, anlysis of sources and basilar topic related to historiography.

SYLLABUS/CONTENT

Contents for students who are taking the 6-CFU course

Fundamentals of Medieval history + reading of a book (for non-attending students).

Contents for students who are taking the 9-CFU course

Fundamentals of Medieval history. In-depth study of a specific aspect of Medieval context.

Contents for students who are taking the 12-CFU course

RECOMMENDED READING/BIBLIOGRAPHY

Bibliography for students who are taking the 6-CFU course

 

A. Cortonesi, Il Medioevo. Profilo di un millennio, Carocci Editore, Roma, 2011.

Inoltre per i non frequentanti un libro a scelta tra:

G. Duby, La Domenica di Bouvines 27 luglio 1214, Einaudi, Torino, 1978

G. Duby, Guglielmo il Maresciallo. L'avventura del cavaliere, Laterza, Bari, 1985

J. C. Shmitt, Medioevo superstizioso, Laterza, Bari, 2010

 

Bibliography for students who are taking the 9-CFU course

 

A. Cortonesi, Il Medioevo. Profilo di un millennio, Carocci Editore, Roma, 2011.

Inoltre un testo a scelta tra i seguenti:

D. Herlihy, La famiglia nel Medioevo, Laterza, Bari, 1989.

R. S. Lopez, La nascita dell’Europa, Il Saggiatore, Milano, 2004.

J. Le Goff, Il cielo sceso in terra. Le radici medievali dell'Europa, Laterza, Roma-Bari 2004.

M. Pastoureau, Medioevo simbolico, Laterza, Roma-Bari, 2004.

M. Bloch, I re taumaturghi, Einaudi, Torino 2005.

R. Pernoud, La donna al tempo delle cattedrali, Civiltà e cultura femminile nel medioevo,  Torino  2017

 

Bibliography for students who are taking the 12-CFU course

 

A. Cortonesi, Il Medioevo. Profilo di un millennio, Carocci Editore, Roma, 2011.

Un  testo a scelta tra i seguenti:

P. Cammarosano, Italia medievale. Struttura e geografia delle fonti scritte, NIS, Roma 1993 (due capitoli  a scelta).

Le biblioteche nel mondo antico e medievale, a cura di G. Cavallo, Laterza, Bari, 1989.

D. Herlihy, La famiglia nel Medioevo, Laterza, Bari, 1989.

G. Duby, Il potere delle donne nel medioevo, Laterza, Roma-Bari 1996.

J. Le Goff, Il cielo sceso in terra. Le radici medievali dell'Europa, Laterza, Roma-Bari 2004.

R. S. Lopez, La nascita dell’Europa, Il Saggiatore, Milano, 2004.

M. Pastoureau, Medioevo simbolico, Laterza, Roma-Bari 2004.

M. Bloch, I re taumaturghi, Einaudi, Torino 2005.

R. Pernoud, La donna al tempo delle cattedrali, Civiltà e cultura femminile nel medioevo,  Torino  2017.

Un altro   testo a scelta tra i seguenti:

J. Le Goff, Il meraviglioso e il quotidiano nell’Occidente medievale, Bari-Laterza 2010

 Le Goff, Il tempo sacro dell’uomo, Bari-Laterza 2014.

Le Goff (in collaborazione con N. Truong), Il Corpo nel Medioevo, Bari-Laterza 2014

 

 

TEACHERS AND EXAM BOARD

Ricevimento: Till 28  March: Monday 10-11 A M ; Wednesday 10-11 A M From  10 April  to  24 April : Tuesday 10-12 A M From 9  May, Wednesday 10-12 A M  

Exam Board

FABRIZIO BENENTE

CLARA FOSSATI

MAURIZIA MATTEUZZI

SANDRA ORIGONE (President)

PAOLA GUGLIELMOTTI (President)

SANDRA MACCHIAVELLO

ANTONELLA ROVERE

LESSONS

Teaching methods

Lessons about the main subjects, anlysis of sources and basilar topic related to historiography.

LESSONS START

2017, September 19

EXAMS

Exam description

Two written texts – which will be given during the semester. The first test is optional, and it consists in a written essay in which students analyze and interpret a historiographic text related to the topics of the course. Students' papers will be corrected by the professor and discussed individually with the student. The purpose of this test is self-evaluation, therefore it won't count towards the final mark. 

The second written test allows students to split the exam in two parts: The first part of the exam will be a written text given during the semester, which will count towards the final mark. This test is optional. This tests consists of 8 to 10 questions. Some questions require specific, straight-to-the-point answers, while other questions require students to present a topic in a more articulated way. For students who pass this test, the final exam (an oral test) topics will be the topics addressed in the second part of the course only. Students can ask the professor to disregard the results of their written test (in this case, the final oral exam topics will include the contents of the whole course). 

 

Assessment methods

Written proof

About  ten questions refering to the topics developed in the first part of the lessons

Oral exam

Assessment of students' proficiency consists in an interview based on general questions. The evaluation commission will assess: students' ability to contextualize topics and to use proper terminology; students' ability to argue using specific, solid knowledge; students' ability to answer to criticism and to requests for further explanation; students' ability to support their answers by making interdisciplinary connections –without straying from the topics of the exam–. The professor can, if necessary, ask more specific questions in order to evaluate more thoroughly students' knowledge of specific topics within the contents of the course. The interview is meant to assess students' ability to debate and their ability to respond to requests for further comments and explanation of particular aspects of their oral exposition.